LETTER: Traveling World Community Film Fest for peace

The Boundary Peace Initiative was pleased to join the No Boundaries film club for the Traveling World Community Film Festival.

Editor:

The Boundary Peace Initiative (BPI) was pleased to have had the opportunity once again to join with the No Boundaries film club in holding the seventh annual Grand Forks screening of  the Traveling World Community Film Festival.

It was presented at the Grand Forks Secondary School auditorium from Feb. 24 to 26.  In addition to 17 international documentary films, the event included displays by the BPI and others, such as the Granby Wilderness Society, the Kettle Valley Food Co-op and the Ponderosa EcoVillage proposal at Christina Lake.

The World Community Development Education Society (worldcommunity.ca) introduced this festival in the Comox Valley in 1990 and now shares the film festival with other communities across B.C. and Canada.

The festival was well attended because of the information and encouragement it gives to those seeking a harmonious shared tenancy of this one, earthly home.

The BPI provided wholesome beverages and treats throughout the weekend and served 110 portions of borscht-bread etc. at two luncheons.  To ease access, the festival offered reduced student or low-income admission, so the BPI also had its food and drink by donation.

It was aided though, by generous food gifts from local individuals and businesses and by the labour of many volunteers.

The BPI also had annual support, with both food (home-baked bread) and financing from the Union of Spiritual Communities of Christ, to express publicly their religio-cultural ethic and to support peace education.

The BPI is a member of the BC Southern Interior Peace Coalition and, since 2003, has been actively promoting respect for people and their environment, the understanding and advancement of all worthy human characteristics, integrity of self and one’s relationship with others, and a vision of the future where living for “goodness’ sake” will have become the overwhelming norm.

Martin O’Brien, Grand Forks