Sweeping ranchlands, grassy vistas and golden plateaus await in BC’s interior. Blake Jorgenson photo.

Sweeping ranchlands, grassy vistas and golden plateaus await in BC’s interior. Blake Jorgenson photo.

Rivers, Ranches and Ranges: From Historic Sites to Wilderness Adventure

Experience some of BC’s history this summer

Wedged between the Coast Mountains and the Rockies, BC’s interior puts you at a crossroads of sweeping ranchlands, grassy vistas, and golden plateaus. And that’s just the landscape. There is a rich history here, too, from the Indigenous peoples whose stories, traditions, and stewardship of the land span millennia, to the ranchers, gold prospectors, and adventurers who braved unknown wilderness to traverse rough terrain and uncharted waterways.

Challenge yourself to try something new and experience some of BC’s history this summer through guest ranch stays, cultural tours, museum visits, guided trips into the backcountry, and more.

Drive Through Historic Gold Rush Country

Follow in the footsteps of 1860s Gold Rush prospectors and see how the mighty Fraser River shaped life in these parts. From Kamloops, head west toward Lillooet and “Mile 0” of the historic Cariboo Wagon Road. Visit sites ranging from preserved road houses to ghost towns and connect with locals in small towns along the way. Travel as far as Barkerville Historic Town, which brings this era to life with a restored townsite and costumed interpreters, and en route discover a vital Indigenous culture that dates back thousands of years.

The quintessential guest ranch experience awaits in the Cariboo and Chilcotin. Blake Jorgenson photo.

The quintessential guest ranch experience awaits in the Cariboo and Chilcotin. Blake Jorgenson photo.

Stay at a Guest Ranch

If you’ve dreamed of long trail rides through peaceful pastures or into meadows bursting with wildflowers, consider a stay at one of BC’s many guest ranches, most of which are found in the Cariboo and Chilcotin. The quintessential guest ranch experience is, of course, riding the range, but when you need a break from the saddle, the possibilities are many. Whether you’re looking for a true cowboy experience (think: corralling livestock or mucking out stalls) or something a little less rugged (a day at the onsite spa, anyone?), you’ll find freedom and adventure in the wide-open spaces.

Cast a line in calm lakes and fast-moving rivers, hike into the mountains for expansive views, or stick close to the ranch – and to the cowboy theme – with wagon rides, lasso throwing, and, of course, tall tales around a campfire under a clear, starry sky.

Find Adventure in the Wild

With wide-open spaces come wide-open opportunities for adventure. The lakes and rivers of BC’s interior beckon with more places to fish than you can experience in a lifetime. There are calm waters for paddling—including multi-day wilderness canoe routes—and there are stretches of thrilling whitewater for adrenaline junkies. You can fly into the backcountry for some hardcore hiking and mountain biking from an alpine basecamp or saddle up for an off-the-grid horse-packing trip. Whichever option you choose, keep your camera close as you’re very likely to spot some of BC’s four-legged residents along the way.

Start planning your summer travel today at ExploreBC.com

British ColumbiaCanadaChilcotinDBC Rivers Ranches RangesGuest RanchHeritageHikingImpressive West CoastMountain bikingPaddlingPartners

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Daryl Jolly, his wife Kerry Pagdin, their sons Cole Jolly (left) and Graeme Jolly, and their dogs Gracie and Clover. Photo: Submitted
Selkirk College arts chair diagnosed with lung cancer, family launches fund drive

Daryl Jolly co-founded the college’s digital arts program

An ambulance waits to pick up an elderly couple injured in a vehicle collision in Christina Lake Monday, June 14. Photo: Laurie Tritschler
Christina Lake collision under investigation, say Grand Forks RCMP

No one was seriously hurt in a two-car collision on Highway 3 Monday, June 14

TELUS is proposing to construct a 5G tower at Pople Park. Photo: Sheri Regnier
First 5G tower in Trail proposed for placement in popular park

TELUS has a consultation process open until June 28

The Kootenay International Junior Hockey League met for their AGM and announced a number of new initiatives, new awards and changes in their executive committee, as well as the starting date for the 2021-22 season. Paul Rodgers file.
KIJHL announces start dates for 2021-22 season

Season set to begin Oct. 1 with league still following all health guidelines

South Slocan’s Ti Loran is among the recipients of this year’s Neil Muth Memorial Scholarship. Photo: Submitted
Neil Muth Memorial Scholarships awarded to 4 students

Students in Creston, South Slocan and Revelstoke are sharing the honour

People watch a car burn during a riot following game 7 of the NHL Stanley Cup final in downtown Vancouver, B.C., in this June 15, 2011 photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Geoff Howe
10 years ago: Where were you during the 2011 Vancouver Stanley Cup Riots?

Smashed-in storefronts, looting, garbage can fires and overturned cars some of the damage remembered today

(Black Press Media file)
Dirty money: Canadian currency the most germ-filled in the world, survey suggests

Canadian plastic currency was found to contain 209 bacterial cultures

(pixabay file shot)
B.C. ombudsperson labels youth confinement in jail ‘unsafe,’ calls for changes

Review states a maximum of 22 hours for youth, aged 12 from to 17, to be placed in solitary

Grace (left), a caribou that was born in a maternal pen north of Revelstoke, is alive and well said the province. It appears she even has a calf. Maternity pens aim to increase caribou calf survival by protecting them from predation until they are older and less vulnerable. (Contributed)
For the first time in years, caribou numbers increasing near Revelstoke

North herd growing but south herd still concerning

Eleonore Alamillo-Laberge, 6, reads a book in Ottawa on Monday, June 12, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Parents will need to fight ‘COVID learning slump’ over summer: B.C. literacy experts

Parents who play an active role in educating their children this summer can reverse the slump by nearly 80%, says Janet Mort

Kelowna General Hospital. (File photo)
COVID-19 outbreak at Kelowna General Hospital declared over

Three people tested positive for the virus — two patients and one staff — one of whom died

The border crossing on Highway 11 in Abbotsford heading south (file)
Western premiers call for clarity, timelines on international travel, reopening rules

Trudeau has called Thursday meeting, premiers say they expect to leave that meeting with a plan

The B.C. government’s vaccine booking website is busy processing second-dose appointments, with more than 76 per cent of adults having received a first dose. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
B.C.’s COVID-19 infections, hospitalizations stable for Tuesday

108 new confirmed cases, 139 in hospital, 39 in intensive care

A worker, at left, tends to a customer at a cosmetics shop amid the COVID-19 pandemic Thursday, May 20, 2021, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Half of cosmetics sold in Canada, U.S. contain toxic chemicals: study

Researchers tested more than 230 commonly used cosmetics and found that 56% of foundations and eye products, 48% of lip products and 47% of mascaras contained high levels of fluorine

Most Read