Indigenous

The sun sets over Al Sahaba mosque in the old market in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, Friday, Nov. 4, 2022. Sharm el-Sheikh will host the COP27 UN Climate Summit starting on Nov. 6. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP Photo/Peter Dejong

Indigenous leaders from B.C. take international stage for a climate policy pitch

First Nations Climate Initiative to reiterate action plan presented in Canada in September

The sun sets over Al Sahaba mosque in the old market in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, Friday, Nov. 4, 2022. Sharm el-Sheikh will host the COP27 UN Climate Summit starting on Nov. 6. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP Photo/Peter Dejong
B.C. archaeologists discovered a projectile point and other archaeological materials, seen in an Oct. 14, 2022, handout photo, during excavation work at the Boitanio Mall site on Wiliams Lake, British Columbia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Williams Lake First Nation

Shopping mall dig reveals Indigenous artifacts, and evolution of archeology

Process involves collaboration and oversight by the Williams Lake First Nation

B.C. archaeologists discovered a projectile point and other archaeological materials, seen in an Oct. 14, 2022, handout photo, during excavation work at the Boitanio Mall site on Wiliams Lake, British Columbia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Williams Lake First Nation
The site of a former residential school where, last month, ground-penetrating radar detected a potential 751 unmarked graves in Cowessess First Nation, Sask., Tuesday, July 6, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Liam Richards

Feds looked to international missing persons commission for help on unmarked graves

The Canadian government approached an international commission that helped identify the remains…

The site of a former residential school where, last month, ground-penetrating radar detected a potential 751 unmarked graves in Cowessess First Nation, Sask., Tuesday, July 6, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Liam Richards
Mitzi Dean, Minister of Children and Family Development, announced changes to the provinces legislation on child welfare on Oct. 26, 2022, that will give First Nations greater control over Indigenous children and youth. (Arnold Lim/Black Press)

Indigenous people to have greater control over child welfare under new B.C. legislation

4 Indigenous governing bodies preparing to take over jurisdiction

Mitzi Dean, Minister of Children and Family Development, announced changes to the provinces legislation on child welfare on Oct. 26, 2022, that will give First Nations greater control over Indigenous children and youth. (Arnold Lim/Black Press)
Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations Marc Miller, centre, Minister of Justice David Lametti and and Minister of Indigenous Services Patty Hajdu, appearing via video conference at left, participate in a news conference regarding the order from the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal to compensate Indigenous children and their families, in Ottawa, on Friday, Oct. 29, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Tribunal says $40B Indigenous child-welfare agreement doesn’t satisfy all orders

Tribunal throws future of the deal into question as it urged the parties to continue negotiating

Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations Marc Miller, centre, Minister of Justice David Lametti and and Minister of Indigenous Services Patty Hajdu, appearing via video conference at left, participate in a news conference regarding the order from the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal to compensate Indigenous children and their families, in Ottawa, on Friday, Oct. 29, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
Mary Brown, program coordinator for the Heiltsuk Gvi’las Restorative Justice Department, is developing a new program for at-risk young women in Bella Bella using $100,000 from a human rights complaint settlement with the Vancouver Police Board. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)

Police settlement with Heiltsuk grandfather to fund new program for at-risk young women

Vancouver Police Board will contribute $100,000 to the Nation’s restorative justice department

Mary Brown, program coordinator for the Heiltsuk Gvi’las Restorative Justice Department, is developing a new program for at-risk young women in Bella Bella using $100,000 from a human rights complaint settlement with the Vancouver Police Board. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)
Maxwell Johnson delivers a speech directed at the Vancouver Police board in attendance as he’s joined by his family during the uplifting ceremony at the Big House in Bella Bella, B.C., on Monday, October 24, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

‘Not enough’: Heiltsuk bemoans police officers’ decision not to attend apology ceremony

Vancouver constables wrongfully arrested Heiltsuk man, granddaughter at bank in 2o19

Maxwell Johnson delivers a speech directed at the Vancouver Police board in attendance as he’s joined by his family during the uplifting ceremony at the Big House in Bella Bella, B.C., on Monday, October 24, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
Maxwell Johnson (left) and Heiltsuk Chief Marylin Slett stand outside a Bank of Montreal Branch on Burrard Street in Vancouver to announce a settlement has been reached after Johnson and his granddaughter were handcuffed outside the branch two years ago. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)

Vancouver police officers who handcuffed Heiltsuk man, granddaughter not at apology ceremony

The Nation and Maxwell Johnson voiced deep disappointment by the officers’ individual decisions not to attend

Maxwell Johnson (left) and Heiltsuk Chief Marylin Slett stand outside a Bank of Montreal Branch on Burrard Street in Vancouver to announce a settlement has been reached after Johnson and his granddaughter were handcuffed outside the branch two years ago. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)
Maxwell Johnson, a Heiltsuk First Nation member who was arrested alongside his granddaughter as they were trying to open an account at the Bank of Montreal, sings and drums outside the bank’s main branch before a news conference in Vancouver, on May 5, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Officers who handcuffed Heiltsuk man, granddaughter may not be attending apology ceremony: Nation

Constables Canon Wong and Mitchel Tong were expected to make apologies in Bella Bella Oct. 24

Maxwell Johnson, a Heiltsuk First Nation member who was arrested alongside his granddaughter as they were trying to open an account at the Bank of Montreal, sings and drums outside the bank’s main branch before a news conference in Vancouver, on May 5, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
An Atlantic salmon is seen during a Department of Fisheries and Oceans fish health audit at the Okisollo fish farm near Campbell River, B.C. Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018. The executive director of British Columbia’s salmon farmers association says a formalized consultation process for the future of the industry is welcome after several years of “ad hoc” discussions stemming from the Liberal government’s pledge in 2019 to end open-net pen salmon aquaculture off B.C.’s coast.��THE CANADIAN PRESS /Jonathan Hayward

Vancouver Island First Nations worry feds flip-flopping on B.C. fish farms transition

BC Salmon Farmers Association ‘heartened’ after its round of meetings with Fisheries minister

An Atlantic salmon is seen during a Department of Fisheries and Oceans fish health audit at the Okisollo fish farm near Campbell River, B.C. Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018. The executive director of British Columbia’s salmon farmers association says a formalized consultation process for the future of the industry is welcome after several years of “ad hoc” discussions stemming from the Liberal government’s pledge in 2019 to end open-net pen salmon aquaculture off B.C.’s coast.��THE CANADIAN PRESS /Jonathan Hayward
A fly fisherman casts on the Kootenai River, downstream from Lake Kookanusa, a reservoir that crosses the border between the U.S. and Canada, on Sept. 19, 2014. First Nations and environmentalists are angry the federal and British Columbia governments continue to stonewall American requests for a joint investigation of cross-border contamination from coal mining in southern B.C.'s Elk Valley. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-The Spokesman Review, Rich Landers

First Nations, environmentalists tired of stonewalling over Kootenays selenium probe

Groups want joint investigation of cross-border contamination from coal mining

A fly fisherman casts on the Kootenai River, downstream from Lake Kookanusa, a reservoir that crosses the border between the U.S. and Canada, on Sept. 19, 2014. First Nations and environmentalists are angry the federal and British Columbia governments continue to stonewall American requests for a joint investigation of cross-border contamination from coal mining in southern B.C.'s Elk Valley. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-The Spokesman Review, Rich Landers
Assembly of First Nations National Chief RoseAnne Archibald, from left to right, lawyer Nancy Sandy, Williams Lake First Nation Chief Willie Sellars, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and Minister of Crown Indigenous Relations Marc Miller walk together on the former grounds of St. Joseph’s Mission Residential School, in Williams Lake, B.C., on Wednesday, March 30, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Supreme Court will not hear from St. Anne’s residential school survivors

Survivors have fought a years-long battle against Ottawa to release thousands of records

Assembly of First Nations National Chief RoseAnne Archibald, from left to right, lawyer Nancy Sandy, Williams Lake First Nation Chief Willie Sellars, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and Minister of Crown Indigenous Relations Marc Miller walk together on the former grounds of St. Joseph’s Mission Residential School, in Williams Lake, B.C., on Wednesday, March 30, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Crystal Smith (far left) and husband Raymond Shaw were unable to register their newborn son's name because it uses Kwak'wala characters. Photo contributed

Island couple takes fight with Vital Statistics over Indigenous name to court

Application to register their child’s name was improperly refused, petition to court says

Crystal Smith (far left) and husband Raymond Shaw were unable to register their newborn son's name because it uses Kwak'wala characters. Photo contributed
Marco Mendicino speaks during a news conference in Ottawa, Monday, Sept. 26, 2022. Mendicino visited on Monday families of victims who died during a mass stabbing, then signed an agreement to explore new ways to improve safety on some First Nations in Saskatchewan. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Ottawa signs agreement to find Indigenous policing solutions after mass stabbing

Chief echoed his calls for Ottawa to help his community establish its own police force

Marco Mendicino speaks during a news conference in Ottawa, Monday, Sept. 26, 2022. Mendicino visited on Monday families of victims who died during a mass stabbing, then signed an agreement to explore new ways to improve safety on some First Nations in Saskatchewan. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Small boats make their way through the Frobisher Bay inlet in Iqaluit on Friday, Aug. 2, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Small boats make their way through the Frobisher Bay inlet in Iqaluit on Friday, Aug. 2, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
FILE – Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, then B.C. Representative for Children and Youth, speaks to a reporter in Vancouver, B.C., on Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

UBCIC backs Turpel-Lafond after investigation questions her Indigenous heritage

It is up to Indigenous communities to determine who belongs, not media, union says

FILE – Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, then B.C. Representative for Children and Youth, speaks to a reporter in Vancouver, B.C., on Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
On Sept. 28, Nasukin Jason Louie poses with Facilities and Operations Manager Ken White and Chief Operating Officer Heather Suttie as they accept the funding of $9.5 million for the Seven Nations Soaring Eagles Wellness Centre. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)

Lower Kootenay Band breaks ground on $9.5M treatment centre

The Seven Nations Soaring Eagle Healing Centre near Creston will offer treatment for substance-use disorders

On Sept. 28, Nasukin Jason Louie poses with Facilities and Operations Manager Ken White and Chief Operating Officer Heather Suttie as they accept the funding of $9.5 million for the Seven Nations Soaring Eagles Wellness Centre. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)
Terry Teegee, regional Chief of the B.C. Assembly of First Nations speaks at a meeting between Canada's premiers and Indigenous leaders at the Songhees Wellness Centre on July 1. (Jake Romphf/News Staff)

New First Nations centre coming to B.C. to give economic development guidance

Centre will look at how to better benefit from sectors such as forestry, mining and natural gas

Terry Teegee, regional Chief of the B.C. Assembly of First Nations speaks at a meeting between Canada's premiers and Indigenous leaders at the Songhees Wellness Centre on July 1. (Jake Romphf/News Staff)
Sheila North Wilson, right, grand chief of Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak, speaks to media as Derek Nepinak, grand chief of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, listens in after RCMP announced at a press conference in Winnipeg, March 18, 2016. More than a year after North unsuccessfully ran to lead one of Manitoba’s largest First Nations political organizations, the Cree leader and journalist is ready to try again. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

‘Pushed to the back’: First Nations women under-represented as chiefs in Canada

Between 15 and 18 per cent of chiefs have been women Canada-wide for the past 15 years

Sheila North Wilson, right, grand chief of Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak, speaks to media as Derek Nepinak, grand chief of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, listens in after RCMP announced at a press conference in Winnipeg, March 18, 2016. More than a year after North unsuccessfully ran to lead one of Manitoba’s largest First Nations political organizations, the Cree leader and journalist is ready to try again. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, front right, and Squamish Nation councillor Khelsilem arrive for an announcement and groundbreaking at the First Nation’s Senakw housing development site in Vancouver on Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022. A Vancouver residents association has launched a legal bid to quash the services agreement between the city and the Squamish Nation relating to the largest Indigenous-led housing and retail development in Canadian history. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Lawsuit targets largest Indigenous-led housing and retail development in B.C. history

Group argues services deal for Squamish Nation’s Senakw project in Vancouver unlawfully approved

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, front right, and Squamish Nation councillor Khelsilem arrive for an announcement and groundbreaking at the First Nation’s Senakw housing development site in Vancouver on Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022. A Vancouver residents association has launched a legal bid to quash the services agreement between the city and the Squamish Nation relating to the largest Indigenous-led housing and retail development in Canadian history. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck