Coronavirus

A man wears a protective face mask to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 as he walks past a billboard from the Vancouver General Hospital in Vancouver Thursday, April 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

B.C. COVID cases undercounted 100-fold amid less PCR testing, modelling group says

The B.C. COVID-19 Modelling Group did have some good news: the BA.5 wave appears to have peaked

 

Researchers at the University of British Columbia have discovered what they are calling a “weak spot” in the virus that causes COVID-19. This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the virus, isolated from a patient in the U.S. THE CANADIAN PRESS/NIAID-RML via AP

B.C. scientists find ‘weak spot’ in COVID-19 virus that could lead to new treatments

“Key vulnerability” is found in all major variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19

 

Kaslo council re-inserted itself into the vaccine mandate debate on July 26. File photo

Kaslo Council to send anti-vaccine mandate letter to province

Council wants mandates lifted for health care workers

 

A protestor wears a helmet decorated as a COVID-19 virus at the Los Angeles “Defeat the Mandate” rally to protest vaccination mandates designed to slow the spread of COVID-19 outside Los Angeles City Hall Sunday, April, 10, 2022. California battled a deadly winter coronavirus surge linked to the omicron variant but began easing masking and vaccination requirements this year as caseloads and hospitalization rates fell, which public health officials largely attributed to widespread vaccination and other safety measures. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Is COVID losing its fangs and becoming more like the flu?

COVID-19 fatality rates substantially lower, approaching that of the annual flu

A protestor wears a helmet decorated as a COVID-19 virus at the Los Angeles “Defeat the Mandate” rally to protest vaccination mandates designed to slow the spread of COVID-19 outside Los Angeles City Hall Sunday, April, 10, 2022. California battled a deadly winter coronavirus surge linked to the omicron variant but began easing masking and vaccination requirements this year as caseloads and hospitalization rates fell, which public health officials largely attributed to widespread vaccination and other safety measures. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
Lianna McDonald, the executive director of the Canadian Centre for Child Protection based out of Winnipeg, poses in Winnipeg on Tuesday, May 17, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Kelly Geraldine Malone

‘A wake-up call’: Online crimes see stark increase during COVID-19 pandemic

Threats and harassment are moving online, according to police

Lianna McDonald, the executive director of the Canadian Centre for Child Protection based out of Winnipeg, poses in Winnipeg on Tuesday, May 17, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Kelly Geraldine Malone
Kansas City Royals’ Andrew Benintendi leaves the batter’s box on an RBI single during the third inning of the team’s baseball game against the Tampa Bay Rays in Kansas City, Mo., Friday, July 22, 2022. (AP Photo/Colin E. Braley)

COVID-19 vaccinations add new twist to MLB trade deadline

Toronto Blue Jays have by far the toughest constraints

Kansas City Royals’ Andrew Benintendi leaves the batter’s box on an RBI single during the third inning of the team’s baseball game against the Tampa Bay Rays in Kansas City, Mo., Friday, July 22, 2022. (AP Photo/Colin E. Braley)
FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, file photo, a passenger wears a face mask she travels on a flight. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

B.C. COVID cases, hospital admissions down this week

There are 29 new deaths for the week of July 17 - 23

FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, file photo, a passenger wears a face mask she travels on a flight. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
(Metro creative stock photo)

B.C. COVID hospitalizations down for the first time in weeks, new cases continue to rise

There are 406 people currently in hospital with COVID-19

(Metro creative stock photo)
A passenger arrives from New Delhi at Pearson Airport in Toronto on April 21, 2021. Infectious disease experts are at odds over the value of testing random travellers into the country for COVID-19 as the federal government relaunched its airport test program Tuesday. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Questions raised about value of random COVID-19 tests for travellers

Randomly selected air travellers at those airports must now report to off-site locations for tests

A passenger arrives from New Delhi at Pearson Airport in Toronto on April 21, 2021. Infectious disease experts are at odds over the value of testing random travellers into the country for COVID-19 as the federal government relaunched its airport test program Tuesday. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
Mandatory random COVID-19 testing resumes today for travellers coming in through Canada's four major airports in Toronto, Vancouver, Calgary and Montreal. A passenger from Air India flight 187 from New Delhi arrives at Pearson Airport in Toronto on Wednesday April 21, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Random COVID-19 testing resumes at four major airports; tests to be done offsite

Actual tests will be completed through an in-person or virtual appointment outside the airport

Mandatory random COVID-19 testing resumes today for travellers coming in through Canada's four major airports in Toronto, Vancouver, Calgary and Montreal. A passenger from Air India flight 187 from New Delhi arrives at Pearson Airport in Toronto on Wednesday April 21, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
FILE - World Health Organization Director for Europe Hans Kluge speaks during a press conference at a vaccination center in Bucharest, Romania, April 7, 2021. The World Health Organization said Tuesday. July 19, 2022 that coronavirus cases have tripled across Europe in the past six weeks, accounting for nearly half of all infections globally. Hospitalization rates have also doubled, although intensive care admissions have remained low. In a statement on Tuesday, Kluge described COVID-19 as “a nasty and potentially deadly illness” that people should not underestimate. (AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru, File)

WHO: COVID triples across Europe, hospitalizations double

Intensive care cases remain low as super-infectious relatives of the omicron variant drive new waves

FILE - World Health Organization Director for Europe Hans Kluge speaks during a press conference at a vaccination center in Bucharest, Romania, April 7, 2021. The World Health Organization said Tuesday. July 19, 2022 that coronavirus cases have tripled across Europe in the past six weeks, accounting for nearly half of all infections globally. Hospitalization rates have also doubled, although intensive care admissions have remained low. In a statement on Tuesday, Kluge described COVID-19 as “a nasty and potentially deadly illness” that people should not underestimate. (AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru, File)
Louis Brier Home and Hospital is a long-term care facility in Vancouver, pictured in 2019. CEO David Keselman said guidelines need to reflect how care has become more complex since he first became a nurse roughly 30 years ago. (Photo: Google Street View).

‘We are still not prepared’: B.C. care home advocates call for action amid recommendations

Experts say it is time to re-evaluate staffing ratio guidelines in the province

Louis Brier Home and Hospital is a long-term care facility in Vancouver, pictured in 2019. CEO David Keselman said guidelines need to reflect how care has become more complex since he first became a nurse roughly 30 years ago. (Photo: Google Street View).
A nurse administers the coronavirus vaccine last year. (Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire)

Boost now or wait? What you should know as B.C. counts down to its next COVID shots

B.C. is only officially recommending second boosters now for older and extremely vulnerable people

A nurse administers the coronavirus vaccine last year. (Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire)
B.C. required people to present a vaccine passport for various indoor events during part of 2021. (Black Press Media file photo)

6-month suspension for B.C. nurse who created fake vaccine cards

Sarah Jones of Castlegar made 4 fake cards in 2021

B.C. required people to present a vaccine passport for various indoor events during part of 2021. (Black Press Media file photo)
Positive, left, and negative COVID-19 antigen rapid tests are picture in Calgary, Alta., Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2022. As research suggests that COVID-19 has infected roughly half of the Canadian population, the emergence of an even more contagious version of the virus is raising concerns that some people may be in for another round.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Already had COVID-19? Here’s what we know about reinfections

About half of Canadians have had COVID-19 so far, research suggests

Positive, left, and negative COVID-19 antigen rapid tests are picture in Calgary, Alta., Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2022. As research suggests that COVID-19 has infected roughly half of the Canadian population, the emergence of an even more contagious version of the virus is raising concerns that some people may be in for another round.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
FILE - An infant receives a routine vaccination at First Georgia Physician Group Pediatrics in Fayetteville, Ga., Aug. 17, 2021. About 25 million children worldwide missed out on routine immunizations against diseases like diptheria, largely because the coronavirus pandemic disrupted regular health services or triggered misinformation about vaccines, according to the U.N. In a new report published Friday, July 15, 2022 the World Health Organization and UNICEF said their data show 25 million children last year failed to get vaccinated against diptheria, tetanus and pertussis, a marker for childhood immunization coverage. (AP Photo/Angie Wang, file)

25 million kids missed routine vaccinations because of COVID

‘This is a red alert for child health’: UNICEF executive director

FILE - An infant receives a routine vaccination at First Georgia Physician Group Pediatrics in Fayetteville, Ga., Aug. 17, 2021. About 25 million children worldwide missed out on routine immunizations against diseases like diptheria, largely because the coronavirus pandemic disrupted regular health services or triggered misinformation about vaccines, according to the U.N. In a new report published Friday, July 15, 2022 the World Health Organization and UNICEF said their data show 25 million children last year failed to get vaccinated against diptheria, tetanus and pertussis, a marker for childhood immunization coverage. (AP Photo/Angie Wang, file)
A nurse is silhouetted behind a glass panel as she tends to a patient in the intensive care unit at the Bluewater Health Hospital in Sarnia, Ont., on Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

B.C. COVID hospitalizations rise for third week in a row

As of July 14, there are 426 people in hospital with COVID, up 15 per cent from the week before

A nurse is silhouetted behind a glass panel as she tends to a patient in the intensive care unit at the Bluewater Health Hospital in Sarnia, Ont., on Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young
People travel at Pearson International Airport during the Covid-19 pandemic in Toronto, on Dec. 3, 2021. Even though air traffic is on the upswing, Covid testing of international passengers is causing the system to be backed up. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Canada bringing back mandatory random testing of travellers arriving at main airports

Testing resume for fully vaccinated travellers arriving at Vancouver, Calgary, Montreal and Toronto

People travel at Pearson International Airport during the Covid-19 pandemic in Toronto, on Dec. 3, 2021. Even though air traffic is on the upswing, Covid testing of international passengers is causing the system to be backed up. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Health Canada is expected to give an update on the approval of Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine for infants and preschoolers between the ages of six-months and five-years old. A family arrives for an appointment at a COVID-19 immunization clinic in Regina, Wednesday, Nov. 24, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Michael Bell

Health Canada approves first COVID-19 vax for youngest kids

Moderna vaccine can be given to young children between the ages of six months and five years old

Health Canada is expected to give an update on the approval of Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine for infants and preschoolers between the ages of six-months and five-years old. A family arrives for an appointment at a COVID-19 immunization clinic in Regina, Wednesday, Nov. 24, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Michael Bell
A customer wearing a face mask waits to buy vegetables. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)

B.C. experts predict COVID cases, hospital admissions will rise due to BA.5

Latest report from the B.C. COVID-19 Modelling Group says cases will rise through July

A customer wearing a face mask waits to buy vegetables. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)