Off-road vehicles will need to be registered

Why registration and a number plate for ORVs are important.

Off-road vehicles

Most of us now know about the new legislation regarding our off road vehicles—ATVs,  side-by sides,  motorbikes,  sleds—and the deadline of July 1, 2015.

Why are registration and a number plate important?

• Modernizing the registration scheme will help enforcement officers better identify irresponsible off road vehicle (ORV) riders that endanger others, damage the environment or harm animals.

• In addition, it will help enforcement officers track stolen vehicles since ICBC’s registration data would be available to officers 24/7.

Many ATV clubs and their members in B.C. support these new regulations and feel the tremendous efforts of all the many partners have contributed to get these regulations this far is amazing and they have done a great job. Many Facebook pages and ORV sites have been bombarded with negative comments and how to’s on avoiding the regulations and filled with misinformation.

We would like to take these regulations and try and get the proper information available and where there is a concern,  answer it so we can get back to what (we hoped) these regulations were meant to do: bring respect and environment responsibility to our sport of motorized recreation.

There is different levels of compliancy.  Here is what we know, but you must tell your ICBC agent what your intended use will be:

  • Just registration: This is for the ICBC database of owner and machine; or who legally owns what. Just like a car ownership, your registration is transferable with the payment of the fee and taxes on the purchase price. Otherwise your registration is good for as long as you own that ORV. You are allowed to operate on private land only.
  • Registration and plate:  When you add $200,000 third party liability insurance, a helmet and a valid driver’s license, you are now legal to operate your ORV on forest service roads and trails. Note: the Trans Canada Trail is becoming a Forest Service Road.
  • Registration, plate and decal: Adding the yearly decal for ICBC liability insurance now also allows you to cross “roads” at designated crossings and unload your ORV in public parking areas. This does not allow you to drive on public roads. It is each operators responsibility to know the difference between a public road and a trail.

For public roads & highways you need:

  • Police-issued operation permit. An operation permit, issued free of charge by police, may be required as a condition of highway operation. Operation permits are not required for highway crossings controlled by a stop sign or traffic light or when loading and unloading an ORV from another vehicle in a parking lot.

In all other circumstances, an operation permit is required for on-highway operation. Operation permits must be obtained from the police department/detachment nearest where an ORV will be operated.

For more information on operation permits, contact the police department/detachment nearest the location you plan to operate. The  MV1815 Operation Permit is under the new MVA regulations; these permits can be issued for a term of up to two years. And having registration makes this process easier.

Tax Questions:

If you purchased an ORV in B.C., brought it into B.C., or received an ORV as a gift, on or before July 1, 2010, no PST documentation is required at the time of registration.

Alternately, if you purchased the ORV in B.C., brought it into B.C., or received an ORV as a gift, on or after July 1, 2010 and did not pay tax, you will be required to pay the applicable sales tax at the time of registration, unless a specific exemption applies.

Similar to other vehicles, ICBC will collect any tax owing at the time of registration.

Local ICBC representatives will be more than happy to supply any further information and answer questions for you.

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