Letter: Why put future generations at risk?

What if one of your loved ones gets ill someday… will you feel somehow responsible? asks Jack Koochin.

Despite abundant opposition, city council has decided to go ahead and complete the universal water meter program.

The former council started this program, knowing full well that a majority of residents opposed it. They chose the most expensive, most disruptive, most invasive, highest health risk, least efficient method of water metering for our town.

A few simple alternatives (set forth in reports from very competent engineering firms) could have been implemented instead, saving our town a fortune, while still being able to effect major water savings. These were ignored.

As a last measure, they could have insisted on water meters at every home, but at least have them installed without the option of radio-frequency (RF) transmitters. But, alas, no.

So now you have multiplied the radio-frequency bombardment of our residents dramatically. Don’t forget, despite what they tell you, it’s a statistic verified by Neptune Technologies that the mobile meter readers can read up to 400 homes at one time. Imagine how much distance is involved to encompass 400 homes, and how much RF energy it would take to transmit that far. It’s a lot. An awful lot.

RF, Wi-Fi, cell phones, smart meters… they are getting some very serious scrutiny and negative press these days, and all the facts are not in yet. There are studies linking cancer, brain tumors, and even autism to prolonged RF exposure. Cancer and tumor incidence are on the rise… could RF exposure be the reason?

According to the Canadian Medical Journal, Aug. 11, 2015, “A committee of parliamentarians from all the major political parties have released a report describing safety risks from cellphones and Wi-Fi as ‘a serious public health issue’ that warrants firm government action to help the public use ‘wireless devices in a manner that protects their health and the health of their families.’”

I could go on with references, and there are lots of them, but you get the point. It’s a highly controversial issue, and time will tell as to the effect of RF energy on humans.

But why even take the potential risk? Why possibly put our future generations at risk? There was absolutely no need for it. We could have achieved an equal or better water saving result with alternative solutions. We had this beautiful, natural valley here, and they chose to fill it with potentially harmful RF radiation.

At this point, this is not about water meters, this is about putting all the residents at risk.

Well, former council, and present “inner council,” this is your legacy. You have brought down the quality of life in Grand Forks. And for no valid reason. This is a very sad time for this town.

And what if you find out that in a few years, research proves without a doubt that RF exposure contributes to the onset of cancer or other disease? What if one of your loved ones gets ill someday…  will you feel somehow responsible?

– Jack Koochin, Grand Forks

 

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