LETTER: Scorned taxpayers

We need to look back to the beginning of this HST fray and remember that it wasn’t just another tax that angered the public; it was the way it was done.

Editor:

We need to look back to the beginning of this HST fray and remember that it wasn’t just another tax that angered the public; it was the way it was done.

No need to rewind that sordid story and its aftermath but don’t think it won’t be a factor in the recently completed referendum vote.

Taxpayers felt scorned, manipulated and disrespected by the political establishment and left without democratic representation as their elected representatives hung them out to dry and supported the tax, with the sole exception of Blair Lekstrom – who now supports it as a cabinet minister.

Such is the sad perversion wrought by the doctrine of party discipline, which has hijacked democratic representation.

The top few who run this province are gyrating with offers and maneuvers to save the tax but it would be a huge mistake for taxpayers to roll over for these people.

By offering a few minor adjustments to the original scheme, they infer they think we are somewhat Pavlovian and can be made to do anything if we are given a treat, a pat and a promise they will actually make the adjustments after the vote.

Seven million dollars of our money allocated by the government arguing for the tax versus $250,000 for the side against is further cynical disrespect.

I personally am astounded by the fact that in all the words of advocacy spoken and written by politicians, and for that matter some of the media, I have not heard a single, solitary word of concern or sympathy about where the money has to come from – the taxpayers pocket, which is already taxed to hell.

It has all been about how HST best serves the government’s needs.

Make them dig their own way out of the hole they dug for themselves in the first place.

Roy Roope, Summerland, B.C.

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