AUG. 7 LETTER: The Peter Principle and Lynch Creek

The announcement by B.C. Timber Sales to log near the Lynch Creek watershed is hardly surprising.

Editor:

Re: BCTS proceeds despite objections (story, July 17, 2013 issue)

The recent announcement by B.C. Timber Sales (BCTS) that the perimeter of Class A Gladstone Provincial Park in the Lynch Creek watershed will be logged is hardly surprising.

Very few politicians and bureaucrats respect our democratic system of governance and sometimes take advantage of the largest and most important stakeholder group; unfortunately, the most impotent “we the people.”

This point is easily validated by our antiquated water management in rural B.C.

In my opinion, bureaucracies are inherently weak. Thirty-four years ago, a university professor (Laurence J. Peter), after extensive research, concluded that people in hierarchal organizations, like bureaucracies, are eventually elevated one level beyond their level of competence. He called this work the Peter Principle – where there is no sting for failure, no buzz for success and you are making decisions for which you will never be held accountable; decision-making is not your game!

There are significant events in our life’s journey that go a long way in defining our character and citizenship. The bureaucrats in BCTS have certainly made such a decision and remind us why so many people hold bureaucrats and politicians in contempt. After all, decisions driven by statutory authority and not fact is now commonplace on the B.C. landscape and it certainly won’t change if we walk away from a fight!

Our new BC Liberal MLA Linda Larson wanted the job of representing the people of the riding, so represent us!

Barry Brandow Sr., Grand Forks

Just Posted

West Kootenay highways a mess as heavy snowfall continues

‘Roads are very icy, people have to be patient and have to slow down’

Over $25,000 raised for Columbia Basin literacy

Success for 2018 Books for Kids campaign

It’s the last day to vote in B.C.’s referendum on electoral reform

Ballots must now be dropped off in person to meet the deadline of 4:30 p.m.

Grand Forks bantam team takes Nelson tournament

The team dominated the competition with some outstanding displays of skill and technique.

Donate to the Grand Forks and District Public Library

The library is undertaking significant washroom renovations.

VIDEO: Close encounter with a whale near Canada-U.S border

Ron Gillies had his camera ready when a whale appeared Dec. 7

Humboldt Broncos, cannabis, Fortnite: Here are Canadians’ top Google searches for 2018

When celebrities died or Canada Post went on strike, Canada turned to Google

B.C. billionaires worth 5,845 times average middle-income household

Economists argue for changes to Canadian tax system benefitting rich

Condominium market still ‘a lot better’ than normal in Vancouver suburbs

The Fraser Valley, east of Metro Vancouver, has long been considered a more affordable haven for first-time homebuyers.

Retired B.C. teacher a YouTube Sudoku sensation

A retired Kelowna teacher has amassed quite the following online by teaching the art of solving a Sudoku puzzle.

UN chief returns as climate talks teeter closer to collapse

Predictions from international climate expert, warn that global warming is set to do irreversible environmental damage.

Trump’s willingness to intervene in Meng detention roils Canada’s justification

The International Crisis Group said Tuesday, Dec. 11 it’s aware of reports that its North East Asia senior adviser Michael Kovrig has been detained.

Scientist awarded $100K for work on Arctic contaminants that led to ban

Derek Muir has received the $100,000 Weston Family Prize for his research that showed those carcinogens were able to move into the Arctic.

Manhunt continues for France shooter

Suspected gunman named, had long police record

Most Read