Without Rob Ford levels of hoopla, Grand Forks council conducts business

Grand Forks council meeting briefs from Nov. 12th.

Grand Forks City Council and senior staff at their temporary new location at the old CanPar building during the regular council meeting on Nov. 12.

Grand Forks City Council and senior staff at their temporary new location at the old CanPar building during the regular council meeting on Nov. 12.

It may have lacked the excitement and hoopla of recent Toronto city council meetings, but Grand Forks managed to conduct business in a timely manner at their latest council meeting despite missing three elected officials.With Mayor Brian Taylor in Vancouver for a meeting, and councilors Gary Smith and Michael Wirischagen absent, it was a small table and a short agenda at the Grand Forks city council meeting on Nov. 12 at the old CanPar building. Coun. Cher Wyers chaired the meeting saying it was her turn as a rotating deputy mayor.Citizen’s on patrolDuring her councilor’s report, Wyers spoke about her involvement in the Grand Forks Citizen’s on Patrol (COP). She has been with COP for the five years that she has been on council.Part of the mandate for the COP program is to use speed boards to monitor drivers around town.“We do speed board monitoring through ICBC,” said Wyers. “They provide the equipment. You’ll see the big board around town and the radar gun that lets driver know how fast they are going. There is an advance sign that says you are being clocked. We also post the speed for that street.”Wyers said that most drivers slow down once they see the signage.“It’s an education awareness primarily,” she said. “The RCMP are around. They know where we are. We let them know where we’ll be set up and so they do make the rounds.”Gary Smith – pest controlAt the Grand Forks council meeting on Nov. 13 council received a declaration from Coun. Gary Smith, who was absent, outlining that he has been providing pest control services to the city and will continue to provide such services. “He’s been forthwith with the information,” said Wyers. “He has to have council approval. It’s not a significant amount of money. He has the expertise and there’s no one else in the community that does it. This way it’s made public.”