B.C. Transportation Minister Claire Trevena (Black Press)

Stricter rules in B.C. mean parental consent required for minors on party buses

Three young people have died in British Columbia aboard party buses since 2008

New safety measures in British Columbia to protect minors on party buses mean parents or guardians will be required to sign consent forms.

The Transportation Ministry says the rules apply to new bookings made after Saturday.

It says in a news release the forms contain information about pick-up and drop-off times, locations, procedures for a particular excursion, and legal and safety requirements of party bus services.

They also state how to report a concern.

The ministry says as of April 1, party bus operators will be required to provide safety monitors for every 15 passengers who are minors.

READ MORE: B.C. quadruples fine against unsafe party buses, limos

READ MORE: Party bus reforms urged after Langley woman dies in Vancouver

It says those employees must be at least 25, be properly trained and report unsafe or illegal conduct by passengers to the driver.

“Families have been waiting a long time for stricter safety standards that help boost safety every single time a minor is travelling on a party bus,” Transportation Minister Claire Trevena said in a statement on Friday.

“I’m very pleased to see these new requirements start up in time for the holiday season and New Year’s Eve.”

Three young people have died in British Columbia aboard party buses since 2008 including a 23-year-old woman who was leaning against a door at the front of a bus when she fell onto a street in downtown Vancouver as the vehicle turned the corner.

In October, the province boosted fines for party buses that don’t meet inspection standards.

Fines jumped from $81 to $318 for the buses and commercial vehicles that don’t display decals saying they passed a safety inspection.

The Canadian Press

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