Jane, whose name has been changed, has lived in Revelstoke for several years. She still hasn’t found the ideal home. (Liam Harrap/Revelstoke Review)

Jane, whose name has been changed, has lived in Revelstoke for several years. She still hasn’t found the ideal home. (Liam Harrap/Revelstoke Review)

Shelter struggles: Landlord takes over rental unit whenever visiting B.C. town

Renter’s story highlights how hard it is to find accommodation in Revelstoke

Jane moved to Revelstoke seven years ago and says she has yet to find a place she wants to live. She likes Revelstoke, but it’s hard to make it work.

“I came here like everyone else, to ski,” says Jane, who asked to remain anonymous as the community is small and she doesn’t want to burn bridges when it comes to finding accommodation.

It’s not easy in Revelstoke. When a post appears on Facebook pages like Revy Rentals, responses are like a tidal wave.

“You all pretend to be perfect. Friendly, clean, outgoing. Everyone is frothing at the mouth appearing to be amazing. Everyone puts on an act,” says Jane.

When her friend started to rent out her home and Jane came to the 3 p.m viewing at 3:02 p.m, she was already behind 10 people.

“I started to well up,” says Jane. “It’s just too hard.”

This is one of the Facebook posts from Revy Rentals. According to it’s author, the post his fake. They wanted to see how many people “would jump at something ridiculous” (Facebook)

Still, Jane got the home and says it’s a good, peaceful and happy spot – by far the best she’s had in Revelstoke.

She hasn’t always been lucky.

Last winter, Jane and her partner lived in another great location, but it came at a high price.

Jane says the landlord purposefully miscommunicated in regards to the rented space and did not include his intentions of coming to stay often. Although he lived in Fernie, he was usually in Revelstoke.

“He was there as much as we were.”

At first, Jane thought they had the whole basement suite, but says they had to stay in the spare room when the landlord came so he could stay in “his space”, usually without a day’s notice.

Sometimes he would stay for a week, party and be the loudest person in the house.

“He called it his Rev-Cave.”

Jane says he would resort to name-calling and insults about their age and home province.

“There’s a line in this community. Between us and them.” The ones who rent and the ones who own.

According to the B.C. tenancy branch and under the Residential Tenancy Act, a tenant is entitled to quiet enjoyment, which includes, but is not limited to, exclusive possession of the rental unit.

“If a tenant feels that their right to quiet enjoyment has been breached, they have the right to see a remedy, such as compensation from the landlord, or a rent reduction, by filing an application for dispute resolution at the Residential Tenancy Branch,” says Lindsay Byers, spokesperson for the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing.

The problem, says Jane, is they never signed a lease.

“I wanted to sign a lease because of his apparent lack of communication and general vibe. I had a bad feeling and was hoping to entitle myself to some rights. He refused to have us sign one.”

And so Jane wasn’t entitled to compensation. When the winter was over, the couple left. Jane says she would have moved out sooner, but finding a home in Revelstoke in the winter is impossible.

Although she wants other renters to find safe and happy homes, she says another reason she wants to remain anonymous is even though her previous landlord manipulated them, “he’s still a part of this community and he doesn’t deserve to be outed.”

Now is the first time Jane won’t be living with the landlord. But she doesn’t know how long she’ll stay in the community.

“I’d love to own a place here, but it’s just too hard.”

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A woman wearing a face mask to curb the spread of COVID-19 uses walking sticks while walking up a hill, in New Westminster, B.C., on Sunday, November 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Interior Health reports 83 more COVID-19 infections overnight

46 cases are now associated with a COVID-19 community cluster in Revelstoke

Slocan Valley communities struggling with the need for high-speed internet should consider Kaslo’s model, according to the Kaslo infoNet Society. Photo: Black Press
Follow Kaslo’s lead for fibre service, says proponent

Tim Ryan of Kaslo infoNet Society says bringing high-speed internet to rural homes is possible

Glacier Gymnastics head coach Sandra Long says she doesn’t understand why her sport is currently shut down while others are allowed to operate. Photo: Tyler Harper
‘It is bewildering’: Nelson sports leaders call out provincial shut down

Indoor group classes for activities such as gymnastics and dance are on hold

A man wearing a face mask to prevent the spread of COVID-19 walks past a mural in Vancouver on Monday, Nov. 30, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marissa Tiel
212 new COVID-19 cases in Interior Health over the weekend

A total of 490 cases remain active; 15 in hospital

From the left: Grand Forks sculptor David Seven Deers, Rotary Club President Grant Hill and Shinning Raven Woman Council member Regina Burrows pose for The Gazette at Seven Deers’ 9th Street studio Friday, Nov. 27. Photo: Laurie Tritschler
Grand Forks Rotarians raise money for Shining Raven Woman project

President Grant Hill said the Rotary Club “had to be a part of it”

The Walking Curriculum gets students outside and connecting with nature. (Amanda Peterson/Special to S.F. Examiner)
‘Walking Curriculum’ crafted by SFU professor surges in popularity

The outdoor curriculum encourages students to connect with the natural world

Interior Health said its new toll-free line will help people connect to health-care services. (File)
Interior Health expands toll-free line to improve access to community care

By calling1-800-707-8550, people can be connected to several health-care services

THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
B.C. researchers launch study to test kids, young adults for COVID-19 antibodies

Kids and youth can often be asymptomatic carriers of the novel coronavirus

A sign is seen this past summer outside the Yunesit’in Government office west of Williams Lake reminding visitors and members to stay safe amid the COVID-19 pandemic. (Rebecca Dyok photo)
B.C. First Nation leaders await privacy commissioner decision on COVID-19 information

Release of life-saving data cannot wait, says coalition of First Nations

MLA Jennifer Whiteside is B.C.’s new minister of education. She is speaking out against Chilliwack school trustee Barry Neufeld and asking him to resign. (Black Press)
New education minister calls on Chilliwack trustee to resign

Whiteside echoes former minister’s promise to look at options to remove Barry Neufeld

Peter Beckett. ~ File photo
Supreme Court of Canada to decide if it will hear appeal in 2010 wife murder trial

Peter Beckett has stood trial twice for murder in connection with the death of his wife, Laura Letts-Beckett

Most Read