RDKB addresses recycling at meeting

The group met on Thursday regarding the downtown Grand Fork recycle bins, which have since been removed.

Tim Dueck (standing)

Questions about recycling in general and Grand Forks’ downtown recycling bins in particular brought out about 15 residents to a meeting with the coordinator of waste management for the regional district.

The group met on Thursday regarding the downtown recycle bins, which have since been removed from their location at the fire hall. Tim Dueck, coordinator of solid waste management for the Regional District of Kootenay Boundary (RDKB), talked about the reasons for moving the bins to the landfill and answered questions. Organizing the meeting, which was held at Happy Days Restaurant, was resident Lorraine Dick.

“I thought the meeting went very well,” said Dick. “I think Tim answered the questions adequately. I believe we (consumers) have to become more conscientious about our ultimate responsibility for the stuff we buy. That stuff has to go somewhere. It doesn’t just disappear. I hope that out of this meeting comes some changes in our buying practices. After all, we are the 99 per cent…we can and will make changes!”

At the meeting, Dueck explained that virtually every resident in Grand Forks has curbside recycling. He said that since May 2014, the RDKB’s curbside recycling program has been funded by Multi-Materials BC (MMBC). MMBC, however, does not provide funding for unstaffed recycling bins such as the one that was at the fire hall.

Dueck agreed that the meeting went well and he was glad to be able to come out from Trail and answer questions from the public.

“I was surprised by the amount of people, though it’s certainly not unwelcome,” he said to the Gazette. “People were certainly passionate about it. I think a lot of questions were answered. The options that are available for residents are quite suitable. All residents in (the city of) Grand Forks have curbside collection, which has to be the most convenient collection available. We’ll come right to your door.”

Dueck said the only users that might be inconvenienced by the removal of the downtown bins would be small businesses. “There are some small businesses that are within walking distance of that site and there is no doubt they will be affected,” he said. “That was an unusual service for any business anywhere in the province. To have a service that available was amazing and that’s unusual. Now small businesses will be asked to drive four minutes to the landfill.”

The Grand Forks landfill is open from Tuesday to Saturday from 8:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. and Sunday from 12 noon until 4 p.m.

Dueck further explained that through their contract with MMBC, the RDKB provides the staffing and the space for the bins at the landfill, while MMBC collects the material. The curbside program is provided by a contractor (Kettle Valley Waste) and includes garbage and recycling on alternating weeks, and green bins every week.

For recycling, the RDKB recommends curbside collection for paper, cardboard, tin cans and rigid plastic containers. MMBC recycling bins at the landfill are to be used for film plastic, glass and styrofoam containers. Once collected, the material is sent to the Cascade Recovery Depot in Kelowna.

Just Posted

Celgar says equipment failure won’t affect production next week

The chip dumper collapse on Oct. 6 is still under investigation

One business break-in among late-September RCMP calls

Thieves stole thousands of dollars in tools earlier this month from B&F Sales and Service

Cops make fentanyl bust in Castlegar

Over 280 pills among drugs seized

Christina Lake artist finds fans in Hollywood

Cindy Alblas spent a day mingling with celebrities and offering them stained glass art last month

Federal candidates debate environmental issues in Castlegar

Few sparks and much agreement between candidates that action is needed

VIDEO: B.C. man’s yard comes alive with grizzlies at night

Malakwa man has captured images of 12 different grizzlies on video

A year after pot legalization in Canada, it’s a slow roll

It’s one year into Canada’s experiment in legal marijuana, and hundreds of legal pot shops have opened

ELECTION 2019: Climate strikes push environment to top of mind for federal leaders

Black Press Media presents a three-part series on three big election issues

ICBC willing to loosen grip on driver claim data, David Eby says

Private insurers say claims record monopoly keeps them out

B.C. principal suspended for failing to help student who reported inappropriate touching

Principal didn’t remove student from the teacher’s class nor call the parents within a reasonable time

Port Moody mayor goes back on unpaid leave during sex assault investigation

Rob Vagramov said he intends to return as mayor in three or four weeks

UBC issues statement after instructor tells students to vote for Liberal Party

University says partisan messaging was not intentional

Feud with Canada Post causes Grasmere Post Office to close its doors

Grasmere Post Office will close Oct. 31, building owners unable to reach agreement with Canada Post

Cowichan Valley brothers win big in lottery for second time

Playing same numbers net big wins over a three year period

Most Read