Chad Wilson, right, was a full-patch Hells Angels member found dead in Maple Ridge Sunday. (Facebook)

Police aim to prevent retaliation after Hells Angel found dead under B.C. bridge

IHIT confirms Chad Wilson, 43, was the victim of a ‘targeted’ homicide

Police are trying to glean more information as to why a full-patch member of the Hells Angels was found dead in Maple Ridge.

Integrated Homicide Investigation Team Cpl. Frank Jang confirmed Tuesday that Chad Wilson, 43, was the victim of a “targeted” homicide when he was found face-down under the Golden Ears Bridge on Sunday.

Investigators had no motive and suspects at this time, Jang added. He would not confirm if Wilson died where his body was found or if it was taken to that spot.

Several men in Hells Angels insignia had emerged from a home on the same street as where Wilson’s body lay, police confirmed, and crossed crime tape to speak with investigators.

Gang units are working to make sure Wilson’s death does not spark retaliation or any uptick in violence around the region.

“We understand when a member of the Hells Angels is found murdered – that’s unsettling news,” Jang said. “We’re going to do our due diligence.”

Jang said he was confident IHIT would be able to convince Hells Angels members, like those who showed up to Wilson’s body, to talk.

“We’re quite good at our job and persuading people to come forward and help solve murders,” he said.

“I think people understand, whether you’re involved in criminality or not, when somebody takes someone else’s life, that’s wrong. That’s a heinous act.”

Wilson had a long history of crime both in and outside of B.C.

Once from Kimberley, he was one of four men arrested in Spain in 2013 on allegations of smuggling cocaine.

Posts on social media reveal ties to the Mission and Haney chapters of the gang, although Jang said investigators could not confirm the exact chapter he was connected to at the time of his death.

Anyone with information is asked to call IHIT at 1-877-551-4448 or email ihitinfo@rcmp-grc.gc.ca. Those wishing to remain anonymous, can contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

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