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Lind Creek Dam near Greenwood set to be removed

Province investing $9ooK to demolish dam, restore fish havitat
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The province is investing $900,000 to remove the dam in Lind Creek and restore fish habitat. Photo: Google Maps

Lind Creek is being restored as a fish habitat with the removal of an obsolete dam that used to help supply water to Greenwood.

The Province is supporting the project with a $900,000 investment that will fund work to decommission the Lind Creek Dam, which is part of the reservoir structure that contains, stores and supplies water to Greenwood, stated a news release from the provincial government.

“The City of Greenwood has made the decommissioning of the Lind Creek Dam a priority,” said John Bolt, mayor of Greenwood. “We are very appreciative that the Province has also demonstrated that it is a priority by providing the full funding for this project.”

The dam has reached the end of its lifespan and will be decommissioned, the release stated.

Following the dam’s removal, restoration work will allow fish to access the creek for rearing and spawning.

“Our government is working with local governments across the province to improve or upgrade aging infrastructure so our communities can continue to thrive,” Anne Kang, Minister of Municipal Affairs stated in the release. “We’re helping the City of Greenwood to ensure that Lind Creek Dam is removed safely, and the creek restored, to ensure the community’s health and safety now and in the future.”

A new replacement reservoir and water-treatment facility will be built as a separate project.

The decommissioning of Lind Creek Dam is a long overdue project and once its gone, it will allow for a safer community and better fish passage, said Roly Russell, MLA for Boundary-Similkameen.

“That’s why our government is working with the City of Greenwood to invest in this infrastructure, benefiting residents today and for the long term.”

This project is a part of a $450-million provincial investment in critical community infrastructure to support clean drinking water, treatment of wastewater and solid waste, and greenhouse gas reduction through public infrastructure projects in communities provincewide.

This is in addition to the $1-billion Growing Communities Fund, which was provided to all 188 B.C. municipalities and regional districts to support their unique infrastructure and amenities needs.



About the Author: Karen McKinley

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