Hate crimes in Canada spiked by nearly 50% last year

Statistics Canada recorded large increases in crimes related to sexual orientation and religion

Hate crimes in Canada shot up by 47 per cent in 2017, according to Statistics Canada figures released Thursday.

Police recorded 2,073 hate crimes last year – 664 more than the year prior – largely because of graffiti and vandalism, and incidents targeting Muslim, Jewish, and black people in Ontario and Quebec.

Hate crimes are classified as those motivated by hatred towards an identifiable group, such as those of a particular race, gender identity, sexual orientation or age.

Figures show 2017 is the worst year since the federal government began tracking hate crime-related data in 2009.

Hate crimes have gone up as the country’s population has become more diverse.

In 2016, one-fifth of Canadians were born outside of the country. By 2036, that figure is projected to rise to nearly one-third.

The biggest spikes were in Ontario, Quebec, Alberta and B.C.

The groups worst hit were Muslims, with a 207-per-cent increase, black people with an 84-per-cent rise, and Jews at 41-per-cent.

Hate crimes against Muslims peaked in February, the month after a mass shooting at the Islamic Cultural Centre of Québec, in which six worshippers were killed.

Overall, hate crimes against religion rose by more than 80 per cent. Hate crimes against Jews made up 18 per cent of all hate crimes in the country. In B.C., hate crimes against Jewish groups climbed a whopping 337 per cent.

Although violent incidents made up a smaller proportion of hate crimes than in years prior, they still rose by 25 per cent.

Hate crimes targeting sexual orientation tended to be more violent, with more than half of the incidents being physically aggressive, compared to 38 per cent overall.


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Rescued snowmobilers ill-prepared for emergency, Castlegar RCMP say

Two men rescued Wednesday night were not ready for overnight in back country

B.C. Interior free from measles

Vancouver measles outbreak hasn’t spread to the B.C. Interior

Boundary Showcase, Take a Seat exhibits call for submissions

The upcoming spring exhibits call for community involvement.

Celebrating Family Day at Wilgress Lake fishing derby

The annual event was attended by over 125 people.

Sell regulated heroin to curb B.C.’s overdose problem: report

B.C. Centre on Substance Use points to organized crime and money-laundering as contributing factors

Australian woman killed in avalanche while snowboarding at Whistler Blackcomb

The woman and her partner were reportedly rescued by ski patrol, but the woman died in hospital

B.C. legislature moving suspended staff controversy to outside review

Whale watching, Seattle Mariners trips billed as emergency preparedness, Speaker Darryl Plecas says

Trudeau tells Canadians to listen to clerk in SNC-Lavalin matter

Privy Council clerk Michael Wernick delivered a blunt assessment at the House of Commons justice

Mueller report looming, new attorney general in hot seat

Robert Mueller is required to produce a confidential report to pursue or decline prosecutions

Regulator’s report unlikely to settle Trans Mountain pipeline expansion battle

The Trans Mountain pipeline will remain a controversial topic both in the political ring and out

B.C. woman shares story of abuse with church officials ahead of Vatican summit

Leona Huggins was the only Canadian in the gathering ahead of a historic summit at the Vatican

Galchenyuk scores in OT as Coyotes edge Canucks 3-2

Vancouver manages single point as NHL playoff chase continues

More people signing up for compulsory vaccines

Maple Ridge mom says public tired of hearing about measles

Most Read