Habitat for Humanity Southeast BC opens new Boundary chapter

The new chapter will allow people in the community to work more directly with Habitat in their community.

Grand Forks and area will soon be seeing a boost in Habitat for Humanity activity, with the opening of a new chapter dedicated to the Boundary region.

Bob Huff, Habitat for Humanity Southeast BC executive director, said the new chapter will allow people in the community to work more directly with Habitat in their community, rather than spreading resources over a huge geographical area.

“Habitat for Humanity Southeast BC is such a large region,” Huff said. “It runs from Rock Creek to the Alberta border and from Golden to the U.S. border.”

The new chapter, he said, will be able to respond to local challenges specific to the community.

The Boundary chapter is the second of two to be established, the first one being in Nelson. A third may be started in Cranbrook, but Huff said there are really no limits of where the chapters can go—as long as there are motivated volunteers to drive them.

Huff said the regional board of Habitat will still be responsible for the legal workings of the group, including issuing tax receipts for donations, but the chapters will do some fundraising and pick projects.

Local resident Lorraine Dick is helping raise awareness of the new chapter and get it off its feet. Dick said she’s liked working with Habitat because of the impact the group has in the community.

“I’ve watched Habitat in Grand Forks busily building houses for the 10 years I’ve lived here and been totally inspired by this group of people,” Dick said. “There are some sad stories in this town. How they can fundraise and build a house, it blows me away. The end result is you give someone a home.”

Huff said Habitat can think outside the box, and they’re hoping for more outside the box thinking from the new chapter.

“Moving forward, chapters in each community can identify the needs and by working with the regional board can come up with a plan to address those needs,” Huff said. “Ultimately what we are about is helping to eliminate poverty. One of the best ways you can do that is by building affordable housing.”

Huff said there is a long held perception that Habitat gives away homes, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Each family pays the full value of their home, including construction costs.

“People gravitate towards the thought of ‘oh, they’re getting a free house.’ That is a misunderstanding. We need to get beyond the idea of these homes being free,” he said. “When [families] pay their mortgage the money goes into our Fund for Humanity, and over time that we use to build another house.”

Dick said she hopes to see the new chapter pick up Habitat work in Grand Forks once more.

“This area, these volunteers, this Habitat thinks outside the box,” she said. “That’s what I see coming, a bunch of new people and new ideas, new energy.”

Interested volunteers can attend the first meeting of the Boundary chapter on July 12 at 7 p.m. at the Grand Forks and District Public Library.

 

Just Posted

Paramedics union raises alarm over spike in out-of-service ambulances

Staffing shortages affecting service levels in Kootenays

Kim Johnson retires from rec department

Johnson had worked at Grand Forks Recreation Department for 25 years

COLUMN: 2018 second-largest on record for food bank

Boundary Community Food Bank added 109 new clients last year

Local students raise salmon in new program

The program typically runs from December to June

Skating club receives donations, to host ice gala

The show kicks off at 7 p.m. tonight

‘Full worm super moon’ to illuminate B.C. skies on first day of spring

Spring has sprung, a moon named in honour of thawing soil marks final super moon until 2020

Bodies of two missing teens recovered in reservoir along Kootenay river

Volkswagen Beetle drove off the road down a steep embankment and into the Pend d’Oreille River Sunday

40 records broken across B.C. as hot streak continues

Abbotsford hottest spot in Canada on Tuesday

B.C. wildfire prevention budget bulked up as dry spring unfolds

Night vision goggles tested for early detection effort

Vancouver driver ticketed twice within 6 minutes for same offence

The man was written up by two different officers for using an electronic device

B.C. teacher reprimanded after incident with Grade 11 student in school gym

Gregory Norman Brock was teaching at a high school in the Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows School District

B.C. man ‘parks’ horse during liquor store pit stop

As long as animal wasn’t jaywalking, no problem, says Parksville official

Starbucks to test recyclable cups, redesign stores in B.C., U.S. cities

The company also said it plans to redesign its stores as it adapts to increasing mobile pick-up and delivery orders

In pre-election budget, Liberals boost infrastructure cash to cities, broadband

The budget document says the Liberals have approved more than 33,000 projects, worth about $19.9 billion in federal financing

Most Read