A conservation officer looks after a whitetail deer which spent last Wednesday night (Aug. 19) with a section of wire fencing around its body. (Mark Walkosky, B.C. Conservation Office)

A conservation officer looks after a whitetail deer which spent last Wednesday night (Aug. 19) with a section of wire fencing around its body. (Mark Walkosky, B.C. Conservation Office)

Grand Forks deer caught in fence rescued by conservation officers near Granby River

The doe spent a night wrapped in the wire after fleeing officers who’d tried to set her free

A whitetail deer is back on her feet after conservation officers in Grand Forks freed the animal from wire fencing near the confluence of the Granby and Kettle rivers.

Officers first approached the doe late last Wednesday, Aug. 19, after a resident reported her struggling to free herself from a piece of fencing deposited by floodwaters along the shore of the Granby, said Conservation Officer Mark Walkosk.

The distressed doe, which had been seen with a number of fawns shortly before she got caught in the wire, took the fencing with her when she fled approaching officers, who suspended their rescue mission in the fading daylight.

READ MORE: Grand Forks Fire, conservation services resuce deer trapped in ice in Feb. 2017

A conservation officer on Aug. 20 holds up a piece of wire fencing which ensnared a deer where the Granby and Kettle Rivers meet at Grand Forks. (Mark Walkosky, B.C. Conservation Office)

A conservation officer on Aug. 20 holds up a piece of wire fencing which ensnared a deer where the Granby and Kettle Rivers meet at Grand Forks. (Mark Walkosky, B.C. Conservation Office)

Officers caught up with her in the same area early the next morning, following another tip by a local resident.

This time, Walkosky said officers tranquilized the doe, removed the fencing and checked her for injuries before she woke up.

He confirmed the doe’s fawns watched from across the river as she rose to her feet.

The B.C. Conservation office is called to rescue wildlife from fences in the Grand Forks area about five times every year, he said.


@ltritsch1
laurie.tritschler@grandforksgazette.ca

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