Grand Chief Stewart Phillip recognized with honorary degree

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip was awarded an honorary degree from the University of British Columbia

After decades of fighting for Indigenous rights, Grand Chief Stewart Phillip was awarded an honorary degree from the University of British Columbia’s Chan Centre on Nov. 28.

Phillip has served as president of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs since 1998. He also served as chief of the Penticton Indian Band from 1994 to 2008 and continues to serve as chairman of the Okanagan Nation Alliance.

Related: Chiefs join anti-pipeline protests in Burnaby

Chief Chad Eneas of the Penticton Indian Band Chief congratulated Phillip in a press release from the ONA.

“When Grand Chief Stewart Phillip began working for our communities and fighting for Indigenous rights, he was not welcome at the table, but he was undeterred. He isa man of conviction, a diplomat, and steadfastly committed to the rights of Indigenous people everywhere. We are proud to call him our own!”

Pauline Terbasket, longtime executive director for the ONA called Phillip a “visionary.”

Related: Grand Chief Stewart Phillip ranks on 50 most powerful list

“Grand Chief Stewart Phillip is a visionary, a man of integrity and I’m proud to call him a mentor. He is a role model for all our young people. The Syilx people join together in celebration of this man who has fought tenaciously for Indigenous title and rights.”

A press release from the ONA expressed gratitude for all his hard work.

“It is our tradition to celebrate the achievements of our people, but today we also pause to honour him for his perseverance and commitment. He has fought many battles, and today we are in a new era, where our Title and Rights are finally being recognized. There is a genuine desire for reconciliation on all sides, and we, the Syilx Okanagan Nation, are the beneficiaries of these tireless efforts to improve the lives of all Indigenous people within our Nation, our province, in this county and internationally.”

Related: Grand Chief Stewart Phillip and wife Joan are 2017 Eugene Rogers Environmental Award recipients

To report a typo, email:
editor@keremeosreview.com
.


@TaraBowieBC
editor@keremeosreview.com


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Kaslo bus fueled by vegetable oil to begin service next month

Mountain Man Mike’s will run routes to Vancouver and eventually Edmonton

Grand Forks woman lays wreath at grave of local soldier buried in England

Cpl. Alfred Gyde Heaven lied about his age to enlist in the Canadian army in 1916

The quirks and perks of living in England

From Grand Forks to Great Britain: Kalyeena Makortoff on becoming a U.K. permanent resident.

One year later, I know we’ll be okay

‘Collectively, we can’t afford to be complacent, nor can we afford for our leaders to be.’

Interior Health study offers take-home drug testing kits to spot fentanyl

Interior Health to evaluate safety of at home drug testing kits aimed at reducing fentanyl overdoses

UPDATE: B.C. pilot killed in Honduras plane crash

The crash happened in the Roatan Islands area, according to officials

Raptors beat Bucks 118-112 in 2OT thriller

Leonard has 36 points as Toronto cuts Milwaukee’s series lead to 2-1

‘Teams that win are tight’: B.C. Lions search for chemistry at training camp

The Lions added more than 50 new faces over the off-season, from coaching staff to key players

Rescue crews suspend search for Okanagan kayaker missing for three days

71-year-old Zygmunt Janiewicz was reported missing Friday

B.C. VIEWS: Reality of our plastic recycling routine exposed

Turns out dear old China wasn’t doing such a great job

Carbon dioxide at highest levels for over 2.5 million years, expert warns of 100 years of disruption

CO2 levels rising rapidly, now higher than at any point in humanity’s history

B.C. ferry stops to let black bear swim past near Nanaimo

Queen of Oak Bay brakes for wildlife in Nanaimo’s Departure Bay

Mother dead, child in critical condition after carbon monoxide poisoning at Shuswap campground

The woman was found unresponsive insider her tent and the youth was taken via air ambulance to hospital

Canada’s parole officers say correctional system has reached breaking point

About half of Canada’s federal parole officers work inside penitentiaries and correctional institutions

Most Read