FortisBC has adapted its BC-based school programming to support those learning from home. (FortisBC)

FortisBC has adapted its BC-based school programming to support those learning from home. (FortisBC)

FortisBC program to help students learn about energy from home

Lessons challenge students to consider social, ethical, environmental implications of energy use

FortisBC has adapted its B.C. based school programming to support those learning from home.

Now, parents and teachers have 30 new ways they can teach students about energy. This new programming support students in Grades 1 to 10.

FortisBC’s Energy Leaders school program is an online platform that allows teachers to downtown complete lesson modules. Originally designed for in-class learning, there are now close to 30 modules available for home learning environments with more to be released next week. They can be easily downloaded for free.

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According to FortisBC, the lessons are designed by local teachers and connect with B.C.’s inquiry-based curriculum across grade levels to teach energy concepts such as the importance of energy in the world, where it comes from, how it’s used in B.C. and why it’s important to use it safely and responsibly.

“As both a parent and partner of a teacher, I have firsthand experience on how challenging it can be to find local materials that support learning at home,” said Danielle Wensink, FortisBC’s director of conservation and energy management.

“Because the Energy Leaders modules are already in line with B.C.’s curriculum, this was an ideal way for us to support parents and educators who are faced with this same challenge.”

The new distance learning materials connect to a variety of kindergarten to Grade 10 subjects including science, social studies and English, as well will look at some of the platform’s most popular modules like Climate change: Earth and its climate. Each module contains a complete set of teaching materials including a lesson plan, slides and handouts that invite students to generate and share ideas, and transfer and apply learning to new situations.

The lessons challenge students to consider the social, ethical and environmental implications of energy use.

For younger grades, caregivers can download a colouring and activity book. Designed for kindergarten and Grade 1, it introduces students to where energy comes from and the actions they can take to conserve energy with fun activities and games, like ‘Easy ways to conserve energy at home’ and the ‘Shortest Shower game’.

Parents and educators can access the modules, available for free download, without a password, from energyleaders.ca/distancelearning.

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