Smoke billows up from a derailed Canadian Pacific Railway train near Guernsey, Sask., on Thursday, February 6, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Matt Smith

Calls for pipelines after fiery train derailment in Saskatchewan

Two derailments in less than two months occurred on the same set of tracks

The reeve of a Saskatchewan municipality where a second fiery train derailment has occurred in less than two months says it’s time for the federal government to look more seriously at pipelines to move oil.

Jack Gibney of the Rural Municipality of Usborne says “oil is going to move one way or another.”

“We have no choice.”

A Canadian Pacific Railway freight train carrying crude oil jumped the tracks near Guernsey, about 115 kilometres southeast of Saskatoon, early Thursday.

The Saskatchewan Public Safety Agency said 32 of the train’s 104 cars derailed and a dozen caught fire, sending flames and thick, black smoke into the air.

The fire was burning Friday morning and the Transportation Safety Board said its investigators could not get to the wreckage as a result.

But the fire was out by late Friday afternoon and about 85 residents who were ordered to leave the agricultural community the day before were allowed back home by 4 p.m. local time, Gibney said.

“They had good response here as far as getting the fires out,” he said. “And the first train is going over the track already.”

Residents also gathered Friday in a town hall in nearby Lanigan, where they met with CP officials. Gibney said people appreciated the rail company’s efforts, but are still concerned about rail safety and the transportation of oil.

Another derailment about 10 kilometres away on the same set of tracks in December also caused a fire when 1.5 million litres of oil spilled.

After the second derailment Thursday, the federal government ordered lower speed limits for all trains carrying large amounts of dangerous goods.

Trains carrying oil move through Guernsey every hour, said Gibney, who added the track is busier than it’s ever been.

“We call it our Canadian pipeline here going by.”

Tom Lukiwski, Conservative MP for the area, said he believes pipelines are the safest way to transport crude oil and bitumen.

“This, I hope, will be a reminder to the government that they have to take a very hard and long look at increasing our pipeline capacity in this country.”

Ian Cameron, press secretary for Natural Resources Minister Seamus O’Regan, said in an email that Ottawa is focused on getting good projects built that are good for the economy while protecting the environment.

Alberta and Saskatchewan have been pushing for pipelines as a better option than rail to move landlocked oil to market.

Bruce Campbell is an adjunct professor at York University in Toronto and author of a book about the deadly Quebec Lac-Mégantic rail disaster in 2013. An explosion caused when tanker cars loaded with crude oil derailed killed 47 people.

Campbell said multiple factors contribute to derailments, including track deterioration and not adhering to speed limitations.

Risk factors are increasing as trains move faster and carry more cars, he said.

READ MORE: Runaway rail car reported on same B.C. train line as fatal 2019 derailment

“There needs to be a safety evaluation of the weight and length. They are getting longer and heavier, putting more pressure on the tracks.”

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Pipeline

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

New ‘hub’ model takes regional approach to doctor recruitment in West Kootenay

Kootenay-Boundary a provincial leader in effectively attracting doctors to work here

Missing Slocan City man found dead

Douglas Morrison went missing in mid-January

School District 51 turns its focus to students’ mental health

‘It’s a shift in our thinking, from what we expect schools to be like and what they are now’

IN PHOTOS: 2020 Wilgress Lake Fishing Derby

Fishermen dotted Wilgress Lake for the Boundary Métis Association’s annual event

Grand Forks marches against gender violence

The Grand Forks march was part of 1 Billion Rising, a global movement against gender violence

VIDEO: Behind the scenes of turning newspapers into digital archives

Kelowna Capital News donated materials dating from 1980 to 2000

Landlord ordered to pay $11K after harassing B.C. mom to move days after giving birth

Germaine Valdez was pressured to move just a few days after giving birth by C-section to her child

Heart attacks strike B.C. husband and wife just over one year apart

Courtenay couple share personal stories to bring awareness to heart month

‘Nothing surprises us anymore:’ U.S. border officials find brain in package

U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents found the brain packed in a glass mason jar in a Canada Post shipment

Adapting to love along the Columbia River

One man starts a GoFundme to help his partner with health costs caused on the trip where they met

B.C., Ottawa sign sweeping 30-year deal for northern caribou habitat

West Moberly, Saulteau co-manage new protection on two million acres

Eyes on police after Trudeau orders blockades torn down, injunctions enforced

The RCMP in B.C. have sent a letter to the traditional leaders of the Wet’suwet’en Nation

B.C. massage therapist suspended following allegations of sexual misconduct

While suspended, Leonard Krekic is not entitled to practice as an RMT in B.C.

Cheapest in B.C.: Penticton gas prices dip below $1 per litre

Two stores in Penticton have gas below a dollar.

Most Read