THE WAY IT WAS: Corset saves woman’s life in 1916

1906: Under contractor Geo. Tierney, grading began on the Kettle Valley Railway with 20 teams and 75 men at work on the first day. Within two weeks 500 men were expected to work on the road. Wages for the men were paid at $2.50 a day.

1906: Under contractor Geo. Tierney, grading began on the Kettle Valley Railway with 20 teams and 75 men at work on the first day. Within two weeks 500 men were expected to work on the road. Wages for the men were paid at $2.50 a day.

1911: The average high for the week was 86 F, with .12 inches of rain.

1916: Mrs. John Tolmich owed her life to the strongly-built corsets of her day. An attacker’s knife blows, directed at her body, lost their force against the corset, causing the knife to bend with the strength of the blows.

1921: Grand Forks is to have a fruit display in the National Fruit Exhibition in London.

1926: Ratepayers voted 179 to four in favour of the purchase bylaw by the city council for acquiring the Smelter Lake property for $2,500.

1931: Action was taken by the Provincial Police Force to effect the arrest of six Doukhobors on the North Fork, as leaders of the group of 175 who refused to give any census information to the enumerator, E.L. Kidd.

1936: Charlotte Acres, former Grand Forks girl who won first place in the renowned Canadian National Exhibition Meet in Lake Ontario, paid a visit to her home here.

1941: The school board authorized plans to build a school auditorium at an estimated cost of $16,000 with the necessary equipment included.

1946: The Krystek’s General Store and the Cascade Post Office were destroyed by fire, along with household furnishings, the store contents and considerable mail. The store, one of Cascade’s landmarks, was operated by R.G. Ritchie for 45 years prior to selling out to J.B. Krystek two years ago.

1951: Gateway Lodge, No. 45, Independent Order of Oddfellows, celebrated their 50th anniversary of the Order in Grand Forks.

1956: Heather Coupland, Alice Hlady and Betty Van Vaas became the three candidates for the upcoming Fall Fair Queen Contest.

1961: Three local youth, George Manson, Don Drummond and George Fedorak, narrowly escaped death or serious injury when a terrorist bomb exploded a few feet in front of them as they were driving on the South Carson Road.

1966: Mrs. Lily Forrester retired after 29 years of teaching.

1971: Fall Fair Queen ‘71 is Miss Rotary, Elaine Durham. Her princesses are Miss Board of Trade, Carol Beauregard, and Miss Gyro, Wendy Docksteader.

1976: Miss Board of Trade, Linda Malove was chosen Miss Grand Forks at Saturday’s Fall Fair Queen Pageant.

1981: Selkirk College board is being asked to approve a proposal to move into Zak’s body shop building in September.

1986: Despite the efforts of both city crews and residents to clear away beaver dams in the Johnston Flats, the beavers keep on blocking the culvert which causes flooding in the area.

1991: Former Boundary resident, Terry LeClair released her tape of Russian music for children called “Sun Shine Brighter.” It was recorded in Grand Forks.

1996: With absentee ballots counted, Liberal candidate Bill Barisoff maintained a hold on the Okanagan-Boundary riding with a slim 33-vote lead of NDP incumbent Bill Barlee. A difference of 36 ballots or fewer would require a recount.

2001: Brian Taylor has handed over the reins as the leader of the B.C. Marijuana Party, though at this point there’s no one around to grab them.

From his home in Grand Forks, he told the Gazette that he was not happy with the direction party president Marc Emery wants to take the group.

2006: Former B.C. Southern Interior candidate Derek Zeisman was charged with one count of dangerous driving for an incident that took place last December.

Zeisman was involved in a head-on collision on Hwy. 22 near Castlegar last December, where both he and a Rossland woman had to be hospitalized – he suffered multiple fractures of the pelvis, a broken leg, broken ribs and a collapsed lung while she had leg injuries and bruising.