Phoenix Mountain wraps up bumpy 2021 season

Marcus Graham waits for a trip up Phoenix Mountain’s T-Bar as the 2021 ski and snowboard season wound down Sunday, March 28. Photo: Laurie TritschlerMarcus Graham waits for a trip up Phoenix Mountain’s T-Bar as the 2021 ski and snowboard season wound down Sunday, March 28. Photo: Laurie Tritschler
It was a balmy 6 C by Sunday afternoon, March 28, but there was clearly good shredding to be had. Photo: Laurie TritschlerIt was a balmy 6 C by Sunday afternoon, March 28, but there was clearly good shredding to be had. Photo: Laurie Tritschler
Head of ski patrol Sebastian “Sea bass” Sullivan shows off his flowing mane at Phoenix’s tow-rope on Sunday, March 28. Photo: Laurie TritschlerHead of ski patrol Sebastian “Sea bass” Sullivan shows off his flowing mane at Phoenix’s tow-rope on Sunday, March 28. Photo: Laurie Tritschler
Thomas Mitchell, pictured here dressed as a brown-hued emoji, probably turned some heads at Sunday’s season-ender at Phoenix Mountain. Photo: Laurie TritschlerThomas Mitchell, pictured here dressed as a brown-hued emoji, probably turned some heads at Sunday’s season-ender at Phoenix Mountain. Photo: Laurie Tritschler
Eight-year-old Max Graham, pictured wearing his finest dino-suit, waited until the last day of the season to try his hand at snowboarding. The Gazette can confirm that Max was shredding pow by 1 p.m. Sunday, March 28. Photo: Laurie TritschlerEight-year-old Max Graham, pictured wearing his finest dino-suit, waited until the last day of the season to try his hand at snowboarding. The Gazette can confirm that Max was shredding pow by 1 p.m. Sunday, March 28. Photo: Laurie Tritschler
Max Graham (right) takes a brake from prep-runs on down the bunny hill, as dad, Michael, fastens his snowboard boot. Photo: Laurie TritschlerMax Graham (right) takes a brake from prep-runs on down the bunny hill, as dad, Michael, fastens his snowboard boot. Photo: Laurie Tritschler
From the left: Eholt’s Klahanie Gross and Grand Forks’ Rocio and Marcus Graham were in fine form for Sunday’s season-ender at Phoenix Mountain, March 28. Photo: Laurie TritschlerFrom the left: Eholt’s Klahanie Gross and Grand Forks’ Rocio and Marcus Graham were in fine form for Sunday’s season-ender at Phoenix Mountain, March 28. Photo: Laurie Tritschler
James Hall, general manager at Phoenix Mountain, said his team at the ski hill was “second-to-none.” Photo: Laurie TritschlerJames Hall, general manager at Phoenix Mountain, said his team at the ski hill was “second-to-none.” Photo: Laurie Tritschler
Grand Forks’ Steve Colbourne was all business (suit) as he shredded Phoenix Mountain on his snowboard Sunday, March 28. Photo: Laurie TritschlerGrand Forks’ Steve Colbourne was all business (suit) as he shredded Phoenix Mountain on his snowboard Sunday, March 28. Photo: Laurie Tritschler
Grand Forks’ Ashley Lawrence (left) and Scott Savitskoff pose for a pic at the bottom of Phoenix Mountain on Sunday, March 28. Photo: Laurie TritschlerGrand Forks’ Ashley Lawrence (left) and Scott Savitskoff pose for a pic at the bottom of Phoenix Mountain on Sunday, March 28. Photo: Laurie Tritschler

Costumed skiers and snowboarders marked the end of Phoenix Mountain’s 2021 ski and snowboard season on Sunday, March 28.

From its late start on Jan. 8, through the sudden departure of the hill’s general manager (GM) and a temporary shutdown in mid-season, the mountain has made it through some rough patches this year — all of them against the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“It was a rough start for Phoenix … but we’ve turned a corner,” new GM James Hall said Sunday afternoon.

Hall replaced outgoing GM, Kevin Rand, who stepped down in late January. Phoenix then hired a new kitchen manager and a new head of ski patrol, Sebastian “Sea bass” Sullivan.

Phoenix meanwhile hopes to raise $125,000 for a used snow caterpillar that would relieve the hill’s lone snow groomer, “Snowman,” whose engine failure closed the mountain for 10 days in mid-February. Phoenix spent around $25,000 to repair Snowman, which Phoenix will keep as back-up machine, Hall explained.

Hall added that he would like to see Phoenix add 14 T-bar “carrier units” to the hill’s ski-lift, which can currently pull 22 patrons at a time. Each T-bar unit costs around $2,600, but Hall said the project could be realized over the long-term.

Hall thanked Phoenix’s new board, holding up the mountain’s “punctual, hardworking and reliable staff” as “second-to-none.”

Anyone who would like to contribute to Phoenix’s on-going fundraiser is asked to contact the Grand Forks Credit Union or visit the “Help Phoenix Ski Hill” page on the crowd-source fundraiser, GoFundMe.com.


 

@ltritsch1
laurie.tritschler@grandforksgazette.ca

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laurie.tritschler@boundarycreektimes.com

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