B.C. dentist fills a need in the world’s poorest countries

B.C. dentist fills a need in the world’s poorest countries

What we do gives people hope. It’s a good feeling to help people who have so little”

Art Martens

livingsignificantly.ca

I have long been curious about the photos on the wall of my Abbotsford dentist’s reception area. The subjects are primarily African or Hispanic. Last week in a conversation in our home, I asked Dr. Sam Edworthy to tell me about them.

A modest man, he’s quite comfortable being addressed as “Sam” by both staff and patients. “In 2000,” he said, “a dentist told me the Northview Community Church was putting together a team to provide desperately needed services in a Mexican village. It sounded interesting so I accepted his invitation to go. It was a fulfilling two weeks and since then I’ve done dentistry in a number of countries.”

“I’ve returned to Mexico about 12 times,” he said in response to my prodding. “Mostly under the auspices of the Abbotsford Vineyard Church. Presently they are establishing a permanent dentistry clinic there so dentists can go for one or more weeks and everything is ready. A lot of our work there has been with single moms.”

On several trips to Ghana, a local pastor expressed an urgent desire for ongoing dental services in his area. Sam trained him in basic dental procedures and the sponsoring church group provided supplies and equipment so he could carry on.

Sam feels it is important that others, including his family, discover the sense of fulfillment he experiences on mission trips. “When my son James was 14 I took him along on a trip to Nepal,” he said. “I wanted him to interact with people of another culture. I also wanted him to understand how fortunate we are in Canada and that we really should help people who have so little.”

Earlier this year Amanda, his adult daughter, accompanied him to Mexico. Apparently she caught his sense of responsibility for serving people who receive little assistance from their government. This November she wants to go with him to Haiti, a country universally known for rampant poverty, dismal living conditions and unbridled corruption. Amanda, who has a PhD in science, is quite willing to help with dentistry.

Sometimes Sam takes along one or more clinical staff. They pay a portion of their expenses which include air fare, travel in the country, meals, accommodation, and occasionally security. When necessary, he subsidizes their participation. He pays for all his personal expenses, brings along dentistry supplies (some are provided by dental companies), plus his own compressor and dentistry unit.

For most of his assistants, this is an extraordinarily positive experience. “There was one early exception,” he noted. “A dental assistant came back with tales of flies, obnoxious odours, overwhelming heat, primitive washroom conditions and more.”

This type of dentistry requires mental and emotional adjustments. Some villages are remote, accessible only by traversing treacherous terrain. Invariably, working and living conditions are primitive.“In one village we go to, we have to dam up the creek so we can shave and wash up at the end of the day. It’s hot and we get pretty sweaty. Also, we have to use non-digital equipment. Up to date equipment is more sensitive to impurities in the water and won’t function. When equipment breaks down, we have to fix it. If the village doesn’t have electricity, we bring a generator and gas. The environment we work in frequently isn’t very sterile.”

Adverse circumstances seem not to faze him. “Almost anything we do in our Abbotsford office, we can do there,” he said. “We regularly do root canals and the results have been very satisfactory.” He noted that at the completion of any procedure, the patient often expects to be given a pill. “For them it’s confirmation they have received medical attention.”

Intrigued by the willingness to leave behind his spotless, well equipped office to work where challenges abound, I asked what motivates him. “We go as a team,” he said. “Some of the members are young and they bring excitement. It’s a good feeling to be part of something important.”

He paused, then said, “the people are grateful for what we do. In one village they brought us the straw mattresses, bed bugs and all, from their own homes. They wanted to give something in return, even though this meant sleeping on a dirt floor. We go into their homes and become friends. What we do gives people hope. It’s a good feeling to help people who have so little.” The pictures on Sam’s wall represent an inspiring story.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Grand Forks’ Roly Russell met with The Gazette after he was named Parliamentary Secretary for Rural Development Thursday, Nov. 26. Photo: Laurie Tritschler
NDP’s Roly Russell named secretary for rural development

Russell formerly represented rural Grand Forks on the Regional District of Kootenay Boundary’s elected board

RNG plant
Construction on ground-breaking RNG plant in Fruitvale set to go in spring 2021

REN Energy partners with Calgary engineering firm for innovative West Kootenay gas plant

COVID-19. (Image courtesy CDC)
47 new COVID-19 cases in Interior Health region

1,538 total cases, 399 are active, ten in hospital

This picture of Taghum resident Marc Savard was taken in February when he first spoke to the Nelson Star and little was known about the virus that had shut him out of his job in Wuhan, China. Photo: Tyler Harper
VIDEO: Once an outlier, Nelson man’s COVID-19 experience now typical

Savard was living in Wuhan, China, when the pandemic began

A B.C. Supreme Court Judge ordered a Grand Forks couple to remove their trailer from its last known whereabouts at a Granby Road beach. Photo: Submitted
Grand Forks couple leave Bare Ass Beach after court injunction

The pair had been in a long and contentious dispute with city hall since last Spring

From the left: Grand Forks sculptor David Seven Deers, Rotary Club President Grant Hill and Shinning Raven Woman Council member Regina Burrows pose for The Gazette at Seven Deers’ 9th Street studio Friday, Nov. 27. Photo: Laurie Tritschler
Grand Forks Rotarians raise money for Shining Raven Woman project

President Grant Hill said the Rotary Club “had to be a part of it”

Black Press Media and BraveFace have come together to support children facing life-threatening conditions. Net proceeds from these washable, reusable, three-layer masks go to Make-A-Wish Foundation BC & Yukon.
Put on a BraveFace: Help make children’s wishes come true

Black Press Media, BraveFace host mask fundraiser for Make-A-Wish Foundation

A B.C. Ambulance Service paramedic wearing a face mask to curb the spread of COVID-19 moves a stretcher outside an ambulance at Royal Columbia Hospital, in New Westminster, B.C., on Sunday, November 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Top doctor urges Canadians to limit gatherings as ‘deeply concerning’ outbreaks continue

Canada’s active cases currently stand at 63,835, compared to 53,907 a week prior

A Canadian Pacific freight train travels around Morant’s Curve near Lake Louise, Alta., on Monday, Dec. 1, 2014. A study looking at 646 wildlife deaths along the railway tracks in Banff and Yoho national parks in Alberta and British Columbia has found that train speed is one of the biggest factors. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
Study finds train speed a top factor in wildlife deaths in Banff, Yoho national parks

Research concludes effective mitigation could address train speed and ability of wildlife to see trains

A airport worker is pictured at Vancouver International Airport in Richmond, B.C. Wednesday, March 18, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Canada extends COVID restrictions for non-U.S. travellers until Jan. 21 amid second wave

This ban is separate from the one restricting non-essential U.S. travel

Menno Place. (Google Street View image.)
B.C. care home looks to hire residents’ family members amid COVID-19-related staff shortage

Family would get paid as temporary workers, while having chance to see loved ones while wearing PPE

A man walks by a COVID-19 test pod at the Vancouver airport in this undated handout photo. A study has launched to investigate the safest and most efficient way to rapidly test for COVID-19 in people taking off from the Vancouver airport. The airport authority says the study that got underway Friday at WestJet’s domestic check-in area is the first of its kind in Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, Vancouver Airport Authority *MANDATORY CREDIT*
COVID-19 rapid test study launches at Vancouver airport for departing passengers

Airport authority says that a positive rapid test result does not constitute a medical diagnosis for COVID-19

114 Canadians were appointed Nov. 27 to the Order of Canada. (Governor General of Canada photo)
Indigenous actor, author, elder, leaders appointed to Order of Canada

Outstanding achievement, community dedication and service recognized

Screenshot of Pastor James Butler giving a sermon at Free Grace Baptist Church in Chilliwack on Nov. 22, 2020. The church has decided to continue in-person services despite a public health order banning worship services that was issued on Nov. 19, 2020. (YouTube)
2 Lower Mainland churches continue in-person services despite public health orders

Pastors say faith groups are unfairly targeted and that charter rights protect their decisions

Most Read