KC Recycling staff. (Submitted photo)

B.C. company expands to recycle all of Canada’s CRT glass

KC Recycling has been in business since 1977

Operations amped up at KC Recycling last week when the company took over all of Canada’s recycling for a specific type of scrap called “CRT” glass, which is a component of cathode-ray tubes.

As the Greater Trail company invests significant green into acquiring more equipment that will increase daily production, such as an automated conveyance and storage system, this expansion is also adding new jobs.

“The whole team at KC Recycling is proud to expand its operations to serve all of Canada,” said Pete Stamper, chief executive officer of KC Recycling.

“The investments will help us to realize our mission of preserving a sustainable world for future generations — right here in the Kootenays, recycling with integrity and safety.”

So far, the expanded CRT production has added four new jobs. Three in the production line, and one in another skilled trade.

With 65 local employees now on the roster, Stamper says the company is proud to play a major role in the circular economy.

Already the leading recycler in the Pacific Northwest for cathode-ray tube glass from old televisions, lead-acid batteries, and electronic scrap, on Monday, KC Recycling announced its commitment to significantly invest by adding capacity to take on the country’s CRT glass waste.

READ MORE: Glencore to close lead smelter in Belladune, NB

The Waneta-based business made this move due to the imminent closure of a lead smelter in Belladune, New Brunswick.

“KC Recycling’s investment will enable the CRT glass in eastern Canada to continue being recycled after the closure,” Stamper explained.

“CRT Glass recycling is critical because it recycles the lead content into new products and eliminates an environmental hazard that could arise from inadequate disposal of lead,” he said.

“KC Recycling has been a leader in this process for many years, processing most of the glass generated in western Canada and the Pacific Northwest.”

All the CRT glass arrives at KC Recycling by truck.

The facility, located on Waneta Highway, now receives approximately 25 truck loads each week.

A cathode ray tube is the glass video display component of an electronic device, usually a television or computer monitor. Recycled CRTs are typically disassembled so that valuable materials can be recovered.

About KC Recycling

In business since 1977, KC Recycling has grown to become the largest lead acid battery (car battery) recycler in western Canada and the Pacific Northwest of the United States.

In addition to lead acid batteries, the company processes electronic waste (e-waste) and CRT glass. All commodity by-products, such aluminum, copper, plastic, and steel, are then sold. For more information, visit KCRecycling.com.



newsroom@trailtimes.ca

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View of KC Recycling facility. (Submitted photo)

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