Letter: Cows help spread weeds

Cows traversing moderate steep grassland slopes create a major erosion problem.

The recent article in the Grand Forks Gazette celebrating the public funding of the invasive weed program is one of many examples of pathetic behaviour by our politicians that showcase why it is virtually impossible to have an honest intelligent discussion of the management of our province’s natural resources.

Cows traversing moderate steep grassland slopes create a major erosion problem which facilitates the spread of invasive weeds and yet this obvious problem is never brought forward in the never ending request for public money to address the problem.

The problem is in your face if you drive up the Gilpin logging road in October or better yet, park your vehicle at the Boothman Ranch home site and walk the gas line to the eastern boundary of the Gilpin Grassland Park in November.

Politics is described as the art of compromise so would it not be smart for the Regional District of Kootenay Boundary leaders responsible for the Kettle River Management Plan which has cost the taxpayer $250,000 to invite ranchers to a public meeting and make the case that future public funding of the Invasive Weed Program will only be supported if ranchers start a dialogue to remove domestic animals from the major tributaries of the Kettle River?

Barry Brandow, Grand Forks