FOR THE BEREAVED: Remembering Christmas morning

Do you remember what it was like as a kid on Christmas Eve? I do. One of my most vivid and cherished memories is from my fourth Christmas.

Do you remember what it was like as a kid on Christmas Eve? I do. One of my most vivid and cherished memories is from my fourth Christmas.

We were at my aunt and uncle’s farm in the country and it was a winter wonderland. We played outside all day long, only coming in to warm up for minute on mom or auntie’s lap, have a quick bite of some delicious Christmas confection and a sip of hot tea. We were anxious to get back outside again.

Our cheeks and hands stung from the cold and our faces were red but we didn’t care; we were having a blast.

That night, when we were all supposed to be asleep waiting for St. Nick to come, my cousin (closest in age) and I decided we were going to stay awake all night and see if we could watch for Santa’s sleigh flying through the air.

Maybe he would land on the roof and we could sneak to the stairs and see him for ourselves.  We were convinced we could hear sleigh bells at one point.

It was freezing sitting by the open window and we were shivering in our pajamas. I still remember how clear the sky was, all black and inky with bright stars.

As the minutes ticked by, it seemed like hours had passed and we began to tire. All the outdoor fun, yummy food and noise finally caught up with us.

Neither one of us wanted to admit we wanted to go to sleep because we were convinced he was coming. I can’t remember if we closed the window ourselves or if my uncle came in to check on us and closed it.

What I remember is the feeling of excitement that was building while waiting for the morning and now when I reminisce, I chuckle to myself and think what a wonderful time it was.

Experiencing the joy and excitement of a small child on Christmas morning can remind us of a time that is happy and fulfilling.

As many of us move back towards simpler times, we have an opportunity to share our stories with younger generations and instill in them that it is not about getting what you want, but rather making it what you want.

It’s a time for peace, a time for love, and a time to reconnect and come together to celebrate our beliefs and traditions.

– Barbara Bleiler is an advertising representatitve for the Grand Forks Gazette